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Chamber Music, page 151

   Found CDs: 2210
 

Rachmaninov & Tchaikovsky Piano Trios - Gould Piano Trio

Rachmaninov & Tchaikovsky Piano Trios - Gould Piano Trio
ID: CHRCD012
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Piano

Tchaikovsky wrote comparatively little chamber music, yet his Piano Trio in A minor, Op. 50, with its kaleidoscopic succession of moods, is probably the first important piano trio by a Russian composer; and it proved very influential. Up to his forties Tchaikovsky had felt an antipathy to the piano trio-combination, and had refused to write one for his patroness, Nadezhda von Meck (whose resident piano trio included, as pianist, a French teenager called Claude Debussy). The occasion that caused Tchaikovsky to change his attitude was the death in March 1881 of the pianist and pedagogue Nikolai Rubinstein, founder of the Moscow Conservatoire, who had not only been a friend but one of Tchaikovsky's sternest critics and most faithful supporters. Deeply affected by losing this significant figure in his life, for a while Tchaikovsky seemed quite unable to compose. He planned a new opera, but then found himself composing the Piano Trio as a tribute to Rubinstein's memory - the dedication actually reads ‘in memory of a great artist'. Tchaikovsky told Countess von Meck that he selected the genre as a means of ‘testing himself', perhaps in order to assure himself that he was still fulfilling Rubinstein's exacting standards. The Trio was composed in Rome during the winter of 1881-2; Tchaikovsky wrote to his brother Anatoli that he was ‘completely engrossed in my new trio, and attracted by this new form of music which I have not tried before and is quite new to me'. After he had finished it he wrote again that ‘it pleases me greatly. Later, maybe, I shall renounce it, and hate it as much as I hate most of my works. At the moment, however, I am proud of it, it satisfies me, and raises me in my own esteem. Lately I felt sure I should not be able to compose any more and life without creative work is pretty pointless.'
Certainly the Trio is a big, ambitious piece in which the composer sets himself a multitude of challenges in what was for him a new medium. After a private performance in April 1882 Tchaikovsky made some revisions before the public premiere, which took place at the Moscow Conservatoire on 18 October with Taneyev playing the taxing piano part. The work was not well received by the press, but did not take long to make its way into the repertoire, where it stands to this day as one of the supreme examples of the piano trio in the Romantic era. Tchaikovsky later sanctioned substantial cuts in its formidable length. The expansive and passionate first movement brims with melodic ideas; it begins with a lyrical tune entrusted to the cello which produces many offshoots in the course of a lengthy exposition. Contrasting with this is a heroic, even martial theme distinguished by massive chordal writing in the piano - indeed the piano part throughout this Trio often resembles the solo part in a concerto. The development section includes a substantial dialogue between cello and piano, and in the coda the opening theme turns elegiac, with a tender duet for violin and cello before the movement finds its calm, sad close. The slow movement is a Theme and Variations, a form of which Tchaikovsky was already an established master. This E major movement is perhaps the most personal and unusual in inspiration of all his variation-sets. He associated the poised and almost classical theme - first stated by the piano - with Rubinstein himself, and the ensuing eleven variations chronicle incidents in Rubinstein's life and memories of times he and Tchaikovsky spent together. As the composer wrote to his halfbrother Modest, ‘one variation is a memory of a trip to an Amusement Park out of town, another of a ball to which we both went and so on'. The Amusement Park is probably to be heard in the quicksilver scherzo of the third variation, the ball in the sixth variation's sumptuous waltz - which also refers to Tchaikovsky's opera Eugene Onegin. But it is better not to look for particular ‘programmatic' connotations in the others. The brief fifth variation, with its high piano writing, is clearly a brilliant evocation of a musical box, according to some commentators - but a ‘troika' or
sleigh-ride, according to others. The eighth is a robust fugue, followed by a lamenting ninth variation marked flebile (mourning, plaintive) with Aeolian-harp figuration in the piano, and a tenth in lively mazurka rhythm. The eleventh variation closes the movement with an enriched restatement of the original theme. Though the second movement is over, the variation process is not. Tchaikovsky's third movement opens with what is, in effect, the twelfth variation in the sequence - a splendidly exciting and vivacious one, large and bold enough to initiate a full-scale finale in A major. It enacts a more or less complete sonata design before its triumphal elation is interrupted by the return of the soulful lyric theme that began the ‘Pezzo elegiaco' first movement, in drastically afflicted unison on the strings against a turbulently emotional piano part. This sudden outpouring of grief issues in a doom-laden coda marked lugubre, where the opening theme is heard for the last time against a Chopinesque funeral-march rhythm in the piano, ebbing away into silence. Tchaikovsky's Trio, with its function as a memorial for Nikolai Rubinstein, seems to have initiated a Russian tradition of ‘elegiac' piano trios - Arensky, for instance, wrote a trio inspired by the death of his (and Tchaikovsky's) friend, the cellist Davidoff. The young Sergei Rachmaninov actually entitled both his early piano trios, composed in quick succession in 1892 and 1893, Trio élégiaque; and the second of those was written under the shock of hearing of the sudden death of Tchaikovsky, who had encouraged him while Rachmaninov was still a student. That three-movement Trio in D minor is by far the better known of the two. Its predecessor, the Trio élégiaque No. 1 in G minor, was written at white-hot speed between 18 and 21 January 1892 and premiered in a recital that the 18-year-old Rachmaninov gave at Moscow Conservatory, where he was still a student, on 30 January. Rachmaninov naturally took the piano part, with his friends the violinist
David Krein and the cellist Anatoly Brandukov (for whom he would later compose a celebrated Cello Sonata.) As far as is known this was its first and last hearing in Rachmaninov's lifetime, and the work was not published until 1947. The fact that it was so speedily written, for performance by the composer himself, probably accounts for the large number of errors in the manuscript and almost complete lack of dynamics in the manuscript, which had to be heavily edited before it was printed. If the later D minor Trio is an elegy for Tchaikovsky, there is no evidence to suggest who might be the subject of the G minor. Its ‘elegiac' nature quite possibly arose from Rachmaninov's own current emotional state. The previous August he had caught a fever as a result of swimming in the chilly waters of the River Matir; his health had deteriorated throughout the Autumn and, though he gradually recovered, he had spent much of the winter in a state of depression. This would seem an adequate explanation for the mood of the Trio, which despite a fine show of activity in its central section seems to end in darkness and despair. The work is in a single movement in a broad sonata-form, with room for some contrasting episodes. Not surprisingly, Rachmaninov assigns pride of place to the piano, making the Trio almost a miniature piano concerto (it was in fact composed shortly after his Piano Concerto No. 1). It opens (with the characteristic expressionmark Lento lugubre) with murmuring, wind-blown string figures that create an evocative background to the dolorous - and already highly charcteristic - main theme, enunciated by the piano. After the strings have had a chance with this melody the music moves to a more active contrasting subject in story-telling style. The development section, marked Apassionato, is principally based on the opening theme and, after a climax and a silence, leads to a full-scale recapitulation of the opening materials. The work concludes with an impressively gloomy coda in the style of a funeral march.
Notes (c) 2010, Malcolm MacDonald
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Johannes Brahms - Chamber Music - The Schubert Ensemble - William Howard

Johannes Brahms - Chamber Music - The Schubert Ensemble - William Howard
ID: CHRCD011
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Piano

“As with so much in Brahms' life, the genesis of his Piano Quintet, op.34, was fraught with indecision and introspection...” Brahms first wrote this work scored for string quintet, and after taking to heart criticism from Joachim, he not only re-scored the work for two pianos, but destroyed the original string quintet manuscript. Published in 1874, this new du version was not without problems, and it was Clara Schumann who pointed these out, causing Brahms to set about re-arranging the music once more, this time for piano quintet.
This was no simple re-scoring, for the piano quintet medium has unique demands, but, at last, “Brahms had found the medium through which his material could speak most eloquently.” It is the quintet in this final guise that we know it best, and that the Schubert Ensemble deliver here on this recording in an assured and expressive performance, allowing the sophisticated detail of Brahms' writing to throw us into the depths of emotion he conjures up.
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PIERNÉ- LOEFFLER - DURUFLÉ- William Dazeley - London Conchord Ensemble

PIERNÉ- LOEFFLER - DURUFLÉ- William Dazeley - London Conchord Ensemble
ID: CHRCD010
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Chamber Ensemble

The London Conchord Ensemble are joined on this disc by the baritone William Dazeley, presenting a seductive collection of fascinating chamber works and songs written by three major 20th Century French chamber music composers.Sensual and intimate, these works epitomise these works epitomise the music of early 20th-century France, with their fluid lines and unusual textures, sensitively captured here by Conchord.

Though born in Berlin, Charles Loeffler claimed to hail from Alsace, so strongly did he identify with the French aesthetic. His Five Songs set poetry by French poets Baudelaire and Verlaine, and his musical style recalls Franck, Chausson and Debussy. Add to this a Russian sense of instrumental colour, and the result is a fascinating concoction of expressive and of expressive and evocative musical elements. Pierné's Sonata Da Camera is reminiscent of Debussy's seminal Sonata for Flute, Viola and Harp in its poignant colours and intricatetextures, while Duruflé's Prélude Recitatif et Variations reveals a different style from that of his Variations reveals a different style from that of his famous Requiem in writing that recalls Ravel.
Throughout this disc, Conchord plays with an effortless grace and flair, a finesse that perfectly, a finesse that perfectly communicates this exquisite selection of music.
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Favoured Fantasies - David W.Bowerman

Favoured Fantasies - David W.Bowerman
ID: CHRCD015
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Piano and Cello

Champs Hill Records is delighted to release this disc of some of the best works by David Bowerman; chamber music recorded in the intimate & refreshing atmosphere of the Music Room at Champs Hill.

Collated from compositions written over the last five years, this CD features a number of well-known and up-and-coming artists. The flautist Daniel Pailthorpe is well known as a key part of the London Conchord Ensemble as well as the Principal Flute of the BBC Symphony Orchestra, Ittai Shapira is a well-respected violinist and regular concerto soloist in the USA and the UK, and Diana Galvydyte is fast establishing a secure reputation as an exceptional young violinist.

David Bowerman (b. 1936) is one of the most recent cause célébres in British music. He gave up early dreams of being involved in music in order to run the family farm, returning to his first love after his retirement. Coming late to the world of composition, he nonetheless demonstrates most original and inventive thoughts, written in a tonal style akin to a range across Dvorak, Elgar and Delius; English composers forming much of his inspiration.
13.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

Mikhail Voskresensky, piano - W. A. Mozart, Vol. 10

Mikhail Voskresensky, piano - W. A. Mozart, Vol. 10
ID: CR143
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Piano

Recorded live at the Great Hall of the Moscow Conservatoire on April 19, 2010

1 - 6 Mikhail Voskresensky, piano
1 - 6 Stanislav Igolinsky, piano
4 - 6 Anastasia Gamaley, piano
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Mikhail Voskresensky, piano - W. A. Mozart Vol. 9

Mikhail Voskresensky, piano - W. A. Mozart Vol. 9
ID: CR142
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Piano

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Mikhail Voskresensky, piano - W. A. Mozart Vol. 8

Mikhail Voskresensky, piano - W. A. Mozart Vol. 8
ID: CR141
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Piano

Mikhail Voskresensky is one of Russia's leading pianists. He is the winner of four international piano competitions (Schumann in Berlin, in Rio de Janeiro, George Enescu in Bucharest, and Van Cliburn in Fort Worth, Texas). In 1966 he was honoured with the Merited Artist of Russia award and in 1989, the People's Artist of Russia. Mikhail Voskresensky has extensive concert experience. His performances has been recorded and issued on more than 50 CDs. His performing art is well known and favored by the audiences worldwide. He is the only pianist in Russia to perform all of Chopin's piano compositions during one concert season (in 1982-83, in nine recitals in the Maly Hall of the Moscow Conservatoire). Mikhail Voskresensky graduated from the Moscow Conservatoire where he studied under Ilia Klyachko, Boris Zemliansky, Yakob Milstein, Lev Oborin (piano) and Leonid Roizman (organ). As student of the famous Lev Oborin, the winner of the First Chopin's Competition in 1927, Voskresensky adopted his teacher's refined romanticism, and perfect taste in harmony with the piano's splendid sound. The images evoked by his playing suggest contrasting musical colours, never out of harmony, with a charming legato inducing the instrument to sing. "His playing fascinates audiences with its artistry, cordiality and ingeniousness. Mikhail Voskresensky is a very talented and intelligent musician", Oborin wrote about his pupil. Voskresensky's repertoire includes Beethoven's 32 sonatas, all works of Chopin, and 64 piano concertos. He has performed with orchestras under the direction of more than 150 conductors, among them - Charles Dutoit, John Pritchard, Franz Konwitschny, Kurt Masur, Eugeny Svetlanov, Kirill Kondrashin etc. Since 2007, he is involved in a project of recording all Mozart piano concerti with Pavel Slobodkin Centre Symphony orchestra in cooperation with the conductor Leonid Nikolaev. After Mr. Nikolaev's death, the project was taken up by the conductor Konstantin Masliuk. On this CD, the eigth in this cycle, Concerti no. 3, 6, and 25 are represented (recorded live from a concert in Maly Hall of the Moscow Conservatory). Mikhail Voskresensky began his pedagogical activities at the Moscow Conservatoire in 1959. For 8 years, he was an assistant to Professor Lev Oborin; since 1963 he has his own class. At present, Professor Voskresensky is the Head of piano chair at the Moscow Conservatoire. His pupils have won 112 prizes in international competitions, among them 49 gold medals. He has participated as juror for many major international competitions. He continues to be Chairman of the Jury for the Scriabin International Competition in Moscow. Mikhail Voskresensky is the President of the Scriabin International Society, and Guest Professor in the Toho Gakuen School in Tokyo. Professor Voskresensky gives numerous master classes in Russia and abroad.
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Muzio Clementi - W.A. Mozart:Sinfonie KV. 550, 551

Muzio Clementi - W.A. Mozart:Sinfonie KV. 550, 551
ID: CNT2063
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Piano

13.00 eur Buy

O. Respighi - Quartetto della Scala - Claudio Voghera, piano - Violin Sonata in B minor - Six piaces for violin and piano

O. Respighi - Quartetto della Scala - Claudio Voghera, piano - Violin Sonata in B minor - Six piaces for violin and piano
ID: CNT2060
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Quartet

This is the first CD our label Concerto dedicates to this great Italian composer, Ottorino Respighi, of international fame.
The String Quartet (Quartetto Dorico) was begun and finished in 1924; in that same year the composer was nominated Director of the Conservatorio di Santa Cecilia.
In a single tempo, the work is built around a single theme, which the string quartet introduces in unison. Within the movement, the traditional, four sections of a quartet can be discerned - Introduction, Scherzo, Adagio, Finale - in each, the theme is developed taking full advantage of the resources offered by counterpoint: from the choral of the Introduction, to the concluding fugato in the Scherzo up to the passacaglia in the Finale. Respighi's perfect quartet scripture certainly owes a lot to his experience as violist.
Even if the date in which the Sonata was begun is uncertain, it is known when it was completed: August 1917; in fact the composer wrote to his wife, his former pupil Elsa Olivieri Sangiacomo: «I have finished the Sonata for violin and piano and I am very pleased with it ».
The piece is articulated in three tempos: 1. Moderato; 2. Andante espressivo; 3. Passacaglia: Allegro moderato ma energico. Following the first movement in classic sonata form with two themes, the first in the tonic, and the second in the relative major, a slow tripartite tempo opens with two extreme sections which unwind in a singing style and with delicacy, in contrast to the agitated central section. But it is the concluding Passacaglia that stands out, shining the preceding sections thanks to a rythmic andamento, which "echoes" the Russian maestros of the end of the 19th century to whom Respighi was often attracted.
The CD is completed by the Six Pieces for Violin and Piano composed between 1901 and 1905, and being for the most part ‘adaptations' of works originally intended for other instruments, these pieces show their experimental nature in their genesis. For example the Aria, the first to appear, was composed in Saint Petersburg, where Respighi kept company with Rimskij Korsakov - and was originally a page written for strings and organ, while the Leggenda and the Berceuse were originally pieces for violin and orchestra and for string ensemble, respectively, and dated to 1902, when the composer was studying with Reger in Berlin. Melodia, also from 1902, is the only piece which right from the beginning was intended for violin and piano. As far as the Valse caressante and the Serenata (1904-1905) are concerned, the first refers to a work for piano and the second to a number from the opera Re Enzo.
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UNITED STATES: LIFE MUSIC 2 - The Ying Quartet

UNITED STATES: LIFE MUSIC 2 - The Ying Quartet
ID: QTZ2055
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Quartet

This CD features newly commissioned works by some of America's leading composers with the aim of producing "a collection of string quartets that connects the music we make with the American experience and issues of our time".

The second volume of the Ying Quartet's accalaimed LifeMusic series.

The Ying Quartet

Ned Rorem
United States - Seven Viewpoints for String Quartet

August Read Thomas
Eagle at Sunrise

Chen Yi
At the Kansas City Chinese New Year Concert

Jennifer Higdon
Southern Harmony

William Bolcolm
Three Rags
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