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Chamber Music, page 16

   Found CDs: 959
 

Vivaldi, Tarakanov - String concertos performed by A. Trostiansky and M.Utkin

Vivaldi, Tarakanov - String concertos performed by A. Trostiansky and M.Utkin
ID: CR069
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Violin

Valery Tarakanov was born in 1934. He studied at the Moscow State University Mechanics and Mathematics Faculty (graduated with distinction in 1956). He followed the postgraduate course at the Mathematics Institute of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR. Since 1961, Valery Tarakanov works in the same Institute; at present, he is one of the leading scientists at the Institute, doctor of mathematics, the author of several monographs and more than 150 scientific works.
Mr. Tarakanov's musical talent led him to study music at the Ippolitov-Ivanov Musical College. Later on, he improved his skills, taking lessons from famous composers Andrei Volkonsky, Eduard Khagagortyan and Edisson Denissov.
The name of Valery Tarakanov is well known in the musical world. His compositions - the opera "Antony and Cleopatra", Vespers, Liturgy, violin and cello concertos, vocal cycles, romances and works for choir - are performed in the important concert halls of Moscow and other Russian cities. Many popular radio stations include them in their programs. Among the performers - most eminent Russian musicians, orchestras, choirs.
Since 1995 Valery Tarakanov is a member of the Composer's Union of Russia; he participates in its musical and social activities.
The music of this exceptionally talented composer, bright and sincere, expressive and highly intellectual, cannot leave the listener indifferent; his works have become widely known among those who love the musical art.

Mikhail Utkin was born 1952 in Vilnius (Lithuania). Since 1959 he studied at the Central Musical School at the Moscow State Conservatory in the class of professor Stefan Kalianov.
In 1970-75, studied at the Moscow Conservatory with Mstislav Rostropovich and later with Stefan Kalianov. Since 1975, followed the post-graduate course in the same class. Winner of the International Competition of the Prague Radio "Concertino-Praha" (1967). Prize-winner of the International String Quartet Competition in Liege (1972). Since 1974, Mr.Utkin has been a member of a well-known ensemble "Moscow Piano Trio". Together with his colleagues - violinist Vladimir Ivanov and pianist Alexander Bonduriansky - he won the First Prize in Budapest (1975) and Maurice Ravel Gold Medal at the international festival "Musical May" in Bordeaux (France, 1976).
Mr. Utkin's concert activity is extensive and diverse. He appears as a soloist and with orchestras; his interpretation of the 2nd Concerto by Shostakovich with Gewandhaus-Orchestra under Kurt Masur (1979) was highly appraised by the press. He plays with "Moscow Trio" and other musicians. Numerous concerts, radio recordings, performances at major European Festivals brought to Mikhail Utkin a standing reputation of top-class performer.
Mr. Utkin was always attracted by contemporary music, he was the first performer of many modern compositions. Later, his creative partnership with famous composers Alexander Tchai-kovsky and Karen Khatchaturian proved to be very fruitful.
In 1978, he was invited by the Moscow State Conservatory to lead a cello-class. He worked at the Conservatory for ten years. Even after he left the post due to his extensive concert tours, he continues to give master classes in Germany (Leon-berg, Schwaebisch Hall, Waiblingen, Kirchheim), Switzerland (St.Gallen), Finland (Kuopio), USA (Hammond, San Marcos, Baton Rouge).
Mr. Utkin's activities were highly appraised. Among other important awards, he received an honorary title of "People's artist of Russia" , the most prestigious title for artists in Russia.

Alexander Trostiansky was born in 1972 to a family of musicians. He began his musical education in Novosibirsk, where his teachers were B. Trostyansky, M. Liberman. Later, he continued his studies at the Moscow State Conservatory in the class of Professor Irina Bochkova. He is a prize-winner of the many international competitions including Premio Paganini (Genoa, Italy, 1990); Centre d'Arts (Orford, Canada, 1996, 1st prize); F.Schubert and 20th Century Music (Graz, Austria, 1997, 3rd prize); Tchaikovsky Competition (Moscow, 1998, 5th prize)
Mr. Trostiansky participated in "Moscow Autumn", "Musik im Michel", "December Evenings by S.Richter", "Oleg Kagan Musikfest" (Kreuth) and other festivals. He recorded with Melodia, Chandos, Dowani, Egan Records, Naxos labels, made recordings for Radio-1-Russia and Orpheus-Radio. He is the soloist of the Moscow Philharmonic Society. He performed in Canada, Czech Republic, Germany, the United Kingdom, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Poland, Slovenia, Switzerland, Turkey, U.S.A., France as well as all over Russia. He appeared in Great Halls of the Moscow Conservatory and St.Petersburg Phil-harmonic, Concerten Congresgebouw de Doe-len, Jurriaanse Zaal (Rotterdam, Holland), Linbury Studio Theatre, Covent Garden (London), Goe-theanum (Dornach, Switzerland), Kravis Perfor-ming Arts Center (West Palm Beach), Schoenberg Hall (Los Angeles), Herbst Theatre (San-Fran-cisco), Weill Hall at Carnegie Hall (New York).
Mr. Trostiansky was the member of "Romantic-Trio" at the Moscow Philharmonic Society in 1997-99. He also played with such musicians as Alexei Lubimov, Alexander Rudin, Natalia Gutman, Alexander Melnikov, Natalia Trull, Denis Shapovalov.
Since 1999 he serves as the professor of violin at the Moscow State Conservatory.
Since 2002 he also teaches at the Department of the Performing on Ancient Instruments at the Moscow Conservatory. Since 2005 he is the Guest-Professor at the Kirov Regional College of Arts. He also teaches master classes in the United Kingdom, France, South Korea, Kazakhstan and over Russia.

Vladislav Bulakhov graduated from the Gnessin Russian Academy of Music as a violinist in 1984. In 1983, he joined the re-established New Moscow Chamber Orchestra headed by Igor Zhukov. Bulakhov's ten years of experience in this orchestra, added to the intensive study with his father, a professional conductor, formed the foundation for the creation of The Seasons Orchestra.
Mr. Bulakhov's artistic manner is characterized by convincing, precise and rhythmically clear gestures, a natural temperament and the ability to bring out each individual voice in the musical score. His intimate knowledge of string instruments enables him to achieve an extraordinary variety of orchestral tone colors with expressive articulation and a seemingly endless range of dynamic gradations. The conductor's careful consideration of the composer's score and his attention to details are displayed in unity with the confident perception of the architectonics of the musical work in the whole.
Vladislav Bulakhov, conductor of The Seasons Orchestra, is capable of interpreting works of various musical eras and styles with equal skill. He possesses the ability to learn new compositions quickly and proficiently, has a talent for management and the capacity to work hard, all of which promise an interesting and creative future for this musician.
© Classical Records
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Nikita Mndoyants, piano - Scarlatti, Beethoven, Schumann, Liszt

Nikita Mndoyants, piano - Scarlatti, Beethoven, Schumann, Liszt
ID: CR096
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Piano

The 27-year-old Russian pianist Nikita Mndoyants has won the 2016 Cleveland International Piano Competition, a tightly contested, two-week contest, which began on 24 July with 31 unusually well-qualified candidates.
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Ch. Delz - Sils, ‘Reliquie’, Drei Auszüge aus ‘Istanbul’ - T. Kordzaia, piano

Ch. Delz - Sils, ‘Reliquie’, Drei Auszüge aus ‘Istanbul’ - T. Kordzaia, piano
ID: GMCD7297
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Piano

Recorded: Radio Studio Zürich, 7-8 April, 2004

Christoph Delz was a pianist as well as a composer. He was born in January 1950 in Basle and received instrumental and theoretical lessons early on in life. He interrupted his time at grammar school to acquire his teaching as well as his concert diploma for piano in Basle. He then took his A-levels. From 1974 to 1981 he continued his studies in Cologne: piano with Aloys Kontarsky, composition with Karlheinz Stockhausen, conducting with Volker Wangenheim. Occasionally he had lessons in composition with Henri Pousseur in Ličge, at the same time working for an electronic studio at the academy of music in Cologne with Hans Ulrich Humpert. He also stayed in Cologne after his actual studies. Christoph Delz did not return to Switzerland until 1989, where he lived in a large house in Riehen near Basle for the remaining four years of his life. During this time, the life of Christoph Delz was dominated by the final stage of his aids infection. Two works were created during this time in Riehen, the “Joyce-Phantasie” (“Joyce Fantasia”) op. 13 and “Istanbul” op. 14 - and in addition the completion of the Schubert fragment. Christoph Delz died in Basle on 13 September 1993.
It becomes quite clear, even from this brief summary, that the piano played a central part in the life of Delz. It is taken into account in almost all his work: in chamber musical instrumentations, as a concert solo instrument with orchestra, as a partner instrument in vocal works, and once even reduced to a percussion instrument. Thus it is not a coincidence that the very first work by this pianist-composer was a piano piece. Opus 1 titled “Sils”, lasting just under 12 minutes can only have been written by someone, who knows the piano very well from all sides; only a pianist is able to achieve such differentiated sound effects. And perhaps it is only possible for an experienced interpreter to develop such a sense for temporal proportions, for the expansion and sequence of individual tonal processes as a composer. In addition, the title “Sils” indicates an inspirational source for this music. Christoph Delz spent many a holiday in Sils in the Engadine. He concerned himself with the Upper Engadine in an artistic way, both as a painter in pictures as well as a composer with sounds. In the music from “Sils” there is the one sentence before the piece begins: “Composed from ideas for sound during a walk across the frozen Lake Silser in the Upper Engadine (Switzerland)”.
During the last months of his life Delz occupied himself with a piece of work of monumental historico-cultural expanse: “Istanbul” for soprano, baritone, solo piano, choir and large orchestra (with all kinds of special instruments ranging from the alto oboe to the baroque harp). Delz is at his most independent where he keeps closest to legacies, “Reliquie” (relic), to the history of music and literature or to experiences made with the world surrounding him.
“Istanbul” is a code for a place where different cultures and religions and with them different music and literature from all times encounter one another. “Istanbul” as a metaphor for the meeting of the ancient world, Christianity and the modern world, in the neighbourhood of the town of Troy, around which an archaic war had been fought, in which all utterances of negotiating and suffering had already occurred, vividly described by Homer in his epics. In Delz’ work, which lasts a good three-quarters of an hour, texts from the “Odyssey” meet with love poems from the ancient Roman world and famous parts from the bible, plus a poem by Hölderlin, even an excerpt from Tschaikowsky’s opera “Eugen Onegin”, and also a speech made by a national socialist prime minister from 1942 during the war. These texts are intermingled with each other and in addition with curses and text extracts from dietary plans. All in all, it is about suffering and hunger, about masculinity, death and salvation, and at the end of both halves of this work there is the Luther choral “Mitten wir im Leben sind, mit dem Tod umfangen” (“We are in the middle of life, surrounded by death”).
When Delz returned from Cologne to Basle in 1989, he planned an increasing number of concerts on a domestic scale. Perhaps there was the justified fear in the back of his mind that playing publicly might no longer be possible for him in the future. It is possible that the “Drei Auszüge aus Istanbul für Klavier oder Synthesizer” (“Three scores from Istanbul for piano or synthesizer”) were created for such a performance. They go back to movements 1, 6 and 12 and are truly scores: the first movement “Ein Nachmittag in Istanbul” (“An afternoon in Istanbul”) is a piano score of the initial movement from “Istanbul” with three short additional inserts of few bars each. The movement “Apotheose” “Apotheosis” is an extended adaptation with internal repetitions only of the piano voice of that original movement with strong choir participation, and in “Misterioso and Signatur” the “score” follows the original voice of the baroque harp and afterwards summarises its own piano voice up to the open cadence chords, which round off the entire work.
After completing “Istanbul”, Christoph Delz, already close to death, turned more intensively to a single piece of work and therefore to a composer of the past, the sonata in C major D 840 by Franz Schubert. It was created, together with two further sonatas in April 1825, but Schubert did not finish the third movement (minuet) and the finale (rondo). For this reason, the piece of work already received the epithet “Reliquie” (“Relic”) in the 19th century; this sonata was even considered Schubert’s last piano work.
The scherzos and/or minuets of the other two sonatas from spring 1825 have a simple ABA form, i.e. roughly the sequence minuet, then trio and afterwards the word-for-word repetition of the minuet part. The trio in G sharp minor from Schubert’s “Reliquie” has completely survived, there are twenty bars or a few more missing from the minuet part. Christoph Delz completed the fragment whilst preserving the original material as far as possible, but in such an order that another fragment resulted from it. First he copied Schubert’s fragment note by note. Where it breaks off, he changed the tone F sharp into an e, which can then directly and without any further addition move to the D sharp at the beginning of the trio. After the trio, however, the minuet does not connect from the front, but instead Delz begins in the middle of an intensified phase, more precisely: from bar 44 on. From this point on he takes over the original word-for-word: after 14 bars the confusions start: the following bar is compressed, a bar excerpt from the trio links up, a minuet bar, a newly composed 6/8 hemiole time and a Ľ time as a joint. All these detours replace bar 59 of the original, there follows a continuation until the original breaks off. This time he changes the point differently: the original F sharp becomes an f, and after two additional bars the minuet starts from the beginning. The beginning is thus played bar by bar again up to the point where the minuet has set in again after the trio, then the movement breaks off, and the rondo finale follows directly.
At first the arrangement follows the original for 146 bars. Then a quaver is inserted: 1/8 time. From then on interferences pile up: bars sound in slow-motion and are then corroded after all, single tones and ranges of voices are lost, the dynamics are changed: forte turns into pianissimo, articulation is interfered with; pauses are added, change of time, even changes in tempo determine the movement which is increasingly falling apart. Suddenly only the first bar halves are played, the second crammed together to a chord, and above them it says in the notes: “Mahler?” This point is a first part, as it were penetrating from the outside. Such short parts will alternate in the sequence with longer phases, which are oriented more towards the original. The second such foreign point brings bars from the minuet trio into reverse, i.e. bars 7 to 5 and 27 to 16. After this confusion of place and time the rondo theme is heard as a false start, but only for 6 bars. And now the crucial part of this completion starts: from now on whole parts are played backwards again and again from where the fragment breaks off, not only bar by bar, but note by note, i.e.: melodic characteristics, rhythm and harmony are so twisted that hardly anything from the original remains perceptible. In between the reverse keeps getting mixed up: the pianist gets hooked on one tone, pauses slip in, whole pause bars, and still foreign bodies penetrate this backward movement. This course stretches from the back end of the fragment backwards to nearly the beginning. The last melody notes lead into an excerpt from the “Unvollendete” (“Unfinished”) symphony by Schubert, a point from the execution of the first movement. There follows a melody. Delz wrote above it again: “Mahler”?. In truth, however, it is not a Mahler excerpt, but the main theme of the head movement of the entire “Reliquie” sonata. This pseudo excerpt submerges into the pianissimo - the movement has ended.
Christoph Delz, the composer, whose life will end before it is completed, completes an unfinished composition by leaving it unfinished, even finishing with an excerpt from the “Unvollendete”. The piece which began as the arrangement of a fragment but was really newly composed, finally blows itself up, it manages a quick jump into another excerpt, but has used up its energy, has eaten itself up from inside just like a slowly dying body. As in “Istanbul” the composer Delz has projected himself and in particular his aids infection into the work of art, not as a euphemistic stylisation, but as a relentless portrayal of what was threatening his life.
12.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

P. I. Tchaikovsky - Children's album, The Seasons - Oxana Yablonskaya, piano

P. I. Tchaikovsky - Children's album, The Seasons - Oxana Yablonskaya, piano
ID: CR111
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Piano

Oxana Yablonskaya was born in Moscow. As an adolescent she attended The Moscow Central School for the Gifted under the tutelage of Anaida Sumbatyan (who also taught Vladimir Ashkenazy) with whom she worked with until the age of 16. She later studied at the Conservatory of Moscow with the legendary Alexander Goldenweiser. At 22, she began a professional relationship with Tatiana Nikolayeva in the Doctorate Program, later acting as her assistant at the Moscow Conservatory. Following graduation with high honors, she was introduced to the Western World in Paris at the Marguerite Long - Jacques Thibaud Competition in 1963, the Rio de Janeiro Competition in 1965, and the Vienna Beethoven Competition in 1969. She won top prizes in all three competitions, and received numerous invitations for return engagements, but because of the Cold War, was not allowed to do so. Despite the reputation she had earned within the Soviet Union and being a prize winner of three international competitions, she was never permitted to play outside the Eastern Bloc. Yet, she recorded for the Melodya label and had earned the prestigious title of Soloist of the Moscow Philharmonic. Outstanding solo performances with the Bolshoi Orchestra, the Moscow Stars series, and the Shostakovich 65th Birthday Celebration Concert were confirmations of her remarkable talent.
In 1977, Ms. Yablonskaya arrived in New York. She made her first New York appearance in a recital at the Alice Tully Hall in Lincoln Center, and received laudatory acclaim from the press. Her Carnegie Hall debut recital the following October was attended by a capacity crowd, and she has since taken her place among the major pianists of the world. Ms. Yablonskaya has now performed in more than 40 countries. Following her triumph at her London recital debut in the Queen Elizabeth Hall in 1982, the Daily Telegraph wrote: "Yablonskaya is the sort of pianist who accomplishes with ease and naturalness what others struggle for a lifetime to achieve". In 1986, following her Canadian performance with the National Symphony under conductor Mstislav Rostropovich, a music critic of the Toronto Star wrote, "She played Rachmaninoff's 3rd as if it was written for her."
She has performed with many of the finest symphony orchestras in the world and with many of the leading conductors of our time such as Rudolf Barshai, Kirill Kondrashin, Nathan Rakhlin, Mstislav Rostropovitch, Gennady Rozhdestvensky, Yury Simonov, Stanislaw Skrowachevsky, Yevgeny Svetlanov and many others. In addition to Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center, she has performed in the Royal Albert Hall in London, Teatro Colon in Buenos Aires, Suntory Hall in Tokyo, Orchestra Hall in Chicago, Royal Concertgebouw, Amsterdam, Great Hall of Moscow Conservatory, Great Hall of St. Petersburgh Philharmonic, Queen Elizabeth Hall in London, Sheldonian Theatre and Holywell Music Room in Oxford, England and many more. In 1990, after a 13 years absence, Ms. Yablonskaya returned to Russia for a sold-out concert, master classes and recitals at the Moscow Conservatory. Since then she has returned on a regular basis and is once more recognized as an elite piano virtuoso in Russia. In addition to her success as a concert pianist and recording artist, Ms. Yablonskaya has held the position of Professor of Piano at The Julliard School in New York City. She has lectured numerous master classes at many distinguished music schools, academies, conservatories and festivals throughout the world such as Newport and Bowdin in USA, Flaine and Tours in France, Lago Maggiore in Switzerland, Oxford Philomusica in England. Dr. Yablonskaya is a Co-Founder of Puigcerda Musica Clasica International Festival in Spain since 1998.
Oxana Yablonskaya is a Yamaha Artist and Artistic Advisor for Yamaha Master Classes in New York City.

© Classical Records
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Bruno Mantovani - Le Sette Chiese

Bruno Mantovani - Le Sette Chiese
ID: KAI0012722
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Chamber Ensemble

Let us open wide the doors of the hothouse so that wind, rain and snow rush in. Maurice Maeterlinck’s image ideally fits Bruno Mantovani as well as the first impression one has of him. That impression is one of youthfulness and freshness, of an unexpected and at the same time encouraging simplicity and health in a world in which these characteristics are atypical, not to say suspect. (Christophe Ghristi)

Includes booklet with texts by Christophe Ghristi and Bruno Mantovani
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Gérard Grisey - Le Temps et l'Écume

Gérard Grisey - Le Temps et l'Écume
ID: KAI0012752
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Chamber Ensemble

1 - Ensemble S / WDR Sinfonieorchester Köln - Emilio Pomarico, conductor / Benjamin Kobler, Paulo Alvares, synthesizers
2 - 6 Schola Heidelberg - Walter Nussbaum, conductor

As the co-founder of spectral music Gérard Grisey moves within a cosmos of partial tones and harmonics, he discloses the secrets of the interior of sound. In a momentous way this is shown inside his music, which acts always in a world between modern technology and poetry.
Sometimes Grisey analyses the different temporal structures of perception of humans, whales and insects or he generates his love songs out from the phonetical basic material. (Martina Seeber)

Includes booklet with text by Martina Seeber and Gérard Grisey
12.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

Music by Paul Müller-Zürich

Music by Paul Müller-Zürich
ID: GMCD7194
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Piano

Recorded: [1]-[4] Switzerland 1963 [5]-[17] St Silas, Chalk Farm, London 20-21 March 2000

Track 1-4 - Swiss Radio Orchestra under Edmond de Stoutz / Gerhard Wieser, viola
Track 5-10 - Andrew Zolinsky, piano
Track 11, 12 - Roland Roberts, violin /Andrew Zolinsky, piano
Track 13-15 - Alan Hacker, basset-horn / Miranda Davis, viola / Oliver Gledhill, cello
Track 16, 17 - Roland Roberts, violin/ Alan Hacker, clarinet / Oliver Gledhill, cello / Adrew Zolinsky, piano

Paul Müller-Zürich was born in Zurich on 19 June 1898. He studied with Philipp Jarnach and Volkmar Andreae at the Zurich Conservatory, then with Jean Batalla in Paris. Müller-Zürich was appointed to the Zurich Conservatory in 1927 as a lecturer in music theory, and remained there until 1968. As teacher, conductor, composer and organiser he belonged to the most significant personalities in Swiss musical life in the twentieth century. He was awarded the Music Prize of the city of Zurich in 1953 and in 1958 received the composition prize of the Swiss Musicians’ Association, whose president he became in 1960. Paul Müller-Zürich died in Zurich on 21 July 1993. His manuscripts lie today in the Zentralbibliothek Zürich.
12.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

Johannes Kalitze - Vier Toteninseln. Six Covered Settings.

Johannes Kalitze - Vier Toteninseln. Six Covered Settings.
ID: KAI0012702
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Voices and Orchestra

Stadler Quartett:
Frank Stadler, violin / Izso Bajusz, violin / Predrag Katanic, viola / Peter Sigl, cello

The stadler quartet was founded in Salzburg in 1992 by the Mozarteum Orchestra´s current concert master, Frank Stadler. The quartet´s members (Frank Stadler, Izso Bajusz, Predrag Katanic, and Peter Sigl) are also members of the renowned Österreichisches Ensemble für Neue Musik (oenm, or Austrian Ensemble for Contemporary Music).

Together, they form the core of the versatile ensemble, which performs a wide range of music but is particularly committed to contemporary music. The stadler quartet has likewise made it their goal to devote themselves to the preparation and study of contemporary works, including the most recent compositions. Since its founding they premiered around 150 works, many dedicated to them.

The repertoire also includes the key works and the standard repertoire of the 20th-century. However, the basis of their music-making remains the great works of the classical and romantic string-quartet tradition. This diversity has earned the quartet an excellent reputation on the concert stage, well beyond specialist circles.

The quartet greatly values their on-going collaboration with contemporary composers, including George Crumb, Helmut Lachenmann, György Kurtág, Johannes Kalitzke, Peter Ruzicka, Jörg Widmann and Chaya Czernowin. The quartet´s appearance in the Salzburger Festival and their numerous concerts and concert series in Salzburg ("ASPEKTE" festival, among others) serve to demonstrate yet again the quality of the quartet and their esteem in the eyes of the public and music circles.

One of the highpoints in the stadler quartet's career was their spectacular execution of Karlheinz Stockhausen's Helicopter Quartet in the Salzburg Festival.

The Four have toured Holland, the Czech Republic, Germany, Slovenia, Norway, Italy, Japan, Korea and Brasil.

The stadler quartet received the prize for "Neues Hören" or "New Listening" from the International Summer Academy of the Mozarteum .

In 2005, the stadler quartet interpretated (in image and sound) Steve Reich´s work "Different Trains" for a documentary film about Betty Freeman.

The “Four Islands of the Dead” are musical “over-paintings” of “Four Serious Songs” by Johannes Brahms; a work of his later years, songs of consolation for the growing certainty, increasingly personal, of his insight into the transient nature of earthly existence. These songs are like places on a shore made safe by biblical texts, from which one glimpses a dark space, the space of the here-and-now. The idea of a hereafter in the course of modern history, with its progressive centuries-long tendency to secularisation, has become more and more diffuse, so that the phenomenon of death at present is often now entirely repressed; a facade of outwardly life-affirming diversions displaces the view to that area outside one‘s personal experience of time. Böcklin‘s “Islands of the Dead” is a suitable comparison here: what lies hidden beyond the shores of the island, behind silence and darkness, is no longer a question of faith, but has come much more a matter of imagination, of fantasy. The essential subject-matter is invisible.

Includes booklet with text by Johannes Kalitzke
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Nostalgia por Mexico • Music by Marroquin • Espana • Olechowski • Castro • Prado etc. - J. Olechowski, piano / E. Durán, flute

Nostalgia por Mexico • Music by Marroquin • Espana • Olechowski • Castro • Prado etc. - J. Olechowski, piano  / E. Durán, flute
ID: GMCD7197
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Piano

Recorded: Sala Nezahualcóyotl, Mexico City, February 1999
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Beyond the Dark • Music by Alwyn • Britten • Dodgson • Elgar • Bennett • Heath • Harty - A. Noakes, flute, G. Tingay, harp

Beyond the Dark • Music by Alwyn • Britten • Dodgson • Elgar • Bennett • Heath • Harty - A. Noakes, flute, G. Tingay, harp
ID: GMCD7202
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Flute

Recorded: Potton Hall, Suffolk 1 & 2 March 2000
12.00 eur Buy
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