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Chamber Music, page 32

   Found CDs: 649
 

W. A. Mozart - Symphony on Haffner's Serenade, Symphony No. 41 „Jupiter“ - Moscow Chamber Orchestra- R. Barshai

W. A. Mozart - Symphony on Haffner's Serenade, Symphony No. 41 „Jupiter“ - Moscow Chamber Orchestra- R. Barshai
ID: MKM224
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Chamber Orchestra

13.00 eur Buy

Northern Crown - Soloists Ensemble - T. Ibragimova, B. Frankshtein, A. Raskatov

Northern Crown - Soloists Ensemble - T. Ibragimova, B. Frankshtein, A. Raskatov
ID: MKM215
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Chamber Ensemble

13.00 eur Buy

F. Schubert - The Schubert Ensemble - „The Trout“, Piano Quintet; Piano Trio No 1 in B Flat

F. Schubert - The Schubert Ensemble - „The Trout“, Piano Quintet; Piano Trio No 1 in B Flat
ID: CHRCD007
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Piano

The Schubert Ensemble has established itself over 24 years as one of the world's leading exponents of music for piano and strings. Familiar to audiences from Los Angeles to Tokyo, the Ensemble has been hailed for its dedication and commitment to both traditional and contemporary repertoire. It has recorded over 20 critically acclaimed CDs and has over 80 new commissions to its name. Its 25th Anniversary season in 2007- 8 will see tours to South Africa, Canada and the USA, as well as appearances at many of Europe's leading venues. In 1998 the group was awarded the prestigious Royal Philharmonic Award for best chamber group.
13.00 eur Buy

Nikolai Miaskovsky - Serenade, Sinfonietta, Concertino, Op. 32

Nikolai Miaskovsky - Serenade, Sinfonietta, Concertino, Op. 32
ID: MKM222
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Chamber Orchestra

13.00 eur Buy

Tchaikovsky - Violin Concerto, Mozart - Sinfonia Concertante - Vladimir Spivakov, Yuri Bashmet

Tchaikovsky - Violin Concerto, Mozart - Sinfonia Concertante - Vladimir Spivakov, Yuri Bashmet
ID: MKM109
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Chamber Ensemble

Recorded in 1982, 1980
Yuri Bashmet, viola (3, 4, 5)
Cadenzas by Spivakov
13.00 eur Buy

Shura Cherkassky - The Complete HMV Stereo Recordings

Shura Cherkassky - The Complete HMV Stereo Recordings
ID: FHR04
CDs: 2
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Piano

Like many other artists, the great Russian pianist Shura Cherkassky fled from what became Soviet Russia and settled in the USA. A student of Josef Hoffman, Cherkassky is considered by many critics to be the last great Romantic pianist. This release from the brand-new First Hand Records label is published to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Cherkassky's birth. Most of the tracks here are issued in stereo for the first time and many have never before appeared on CD. This set, which features over two hours of music, is a significant historical classical piano release and provides a major boost to the limited Cherkassky discography currently available.

A 2CD set of Shura Cherkassky's complete and unpublished stereo recordings made for the HMV record label over 50 years ago. Remastered from the original stereo tapes, First Hand Records released the recordings in May 2009, the majority of which have appear for the first time in any format.
Recorded in 1956 & 1958 at Abbey Road Studios, London and remastered there in 2009. The set spans over 400 years of keyboard repertoire, from Bach to Poulenc.

Recorded in Abbey Road Studio No. 3, London, 1956 & 1958, and Kingsway Hall, London, 1958 (Litolff Scherzo)

INTERNATIONAL PIANO MAGAZINE AWARD WINNER FOR BEST REISSUE/VINTAGE RELEASE OF 2009

Issue note:
Throughout his recording career, Cherkassky flirted with different record labels, never really settling with one company. His first recording for an EMI company was in 1929 (HMV) and the last, a recording of the Litolff Scherzo, in 1967 (New World Records). He was wary of the recording studio, feeling happier performing to an audience, which resulted in a comparatively limited discography. Cherkassky was probably at his peak in the mid to late 1950s, just as his career began to accelerate in the UK. These HMV recordings, made in 1956 and 1958, contain some of the earliest EMI stereo recordings, when the technology was still at an experimental stage (EMI introduced twin-track 7.5 ips stereosonic tapes in 1955, followed in 1958 by stereophonic LPs). Quite often, these stereo recordings suffered from technical problems, including equipment failure, which resulted in many recordings not even making it to tape. Some EMI recording sessions from this period were taped in both mono and stereo concurrently, including these Cherkassky recordings. Only the mono versions were intended for immediate release as the equipment for playing stereo LPs was not yet widely available. Indeed, the majority of the tracks on this CD release have only ever been published in their mono versions. The Chopin works, apart from Ballade No. 3, was released on stereosonic tape in 1957 and the Litolff Scherzo appeared in 1963 on a stereo LP entitled “An Evening at the Proms”.

The recordings on this CD issue were made at Abbey Road Studios, London (Litolff Scherzo was recorded in Kingsway Hall, London) and remastered there in 2009 using the original EMI stereo source tapes. These tapes had been left dormant in the EMI archive for over 50 years, alongside masses of other unpublished stereo recordings from this era, which still remain untouched.
The preservation of the piano’s natural acoustic sound was a vital part of the remastering process. With this in mind, we chose not to make an issue of removing the audible hiss that is present on the tapes, to avoid diminishing the acoustic depth and dynamic range of the piano.

Although remembered mainly for his performances of romantic repertoire, Cherkassky had wide-ranging and sometimes idiosyncratic tastes in programming. Alongside standard repertoire, he was also known to perform music by Boulez, Stockhausen, Ligeti and even performed boogie-woogie! This CD release illustrates this diversity of style in a mixture of musical bonbons, warhorses and encore works spanning three centuries. Cherkassky’s trademark lyricism, his exciting unpredictability and his dazzling virtuosity are in abundance throughout this significant historical issue. This is a significant addition to the Cherkassky discography.
13.00 eur Buy

Natalia Troull, piano - F. Schubert , F. Liszt

Natalia Troull, piano - F. Schubert , F. Liszt
ID: SMCCD0045
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Piano

Schubert-Liszt Song transcriptions
13.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

Rachmaninov & Tchaikovsky Piano Trios - Gould Piano Trio

Rachmaninov & Tchaikovsky Piano Trios - Gould Piano Trio
ID: CHRCD012
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Piano

Tchaikovsky wrote comparatively little chamber music, yet his Piano Trio in A minor, Op. 50, with its kaleidoscopic succession of moods, is probably the first important piano trio by a Russian composer; and it proved very influential. Up to his forties Tchaikovsky had felt an antipathy to the piano trio-combination, and had refused to write one for his patroness, Nadezhda von Meck (whose resident piano trio included, as pianist, a French teenager called Claude Debussy). The occasion that caused Tchaikovsky to change his attitude was the death in March 1881 of the pianist and pedagogue Nikolai Rubinstein, founder of the Moscow Conservatoire, who had not only been a friend but one of Tchaikovsky's sternest critics and most faithful supporters. Deeply affected by losing this significant figure in his life, for a while Tchaikovsky seemed quite unable to compose. He planned a new opera, but then found himself composing the Piano Trio as a tribute to Rubinstein's memory - the dedication actually reads ‘in memory of a great artist'. Tchaikovsky told Countess von Meck that he selected the genre as a means of ‘testing himself', perhaps in order to assure himself that he was still fulfilling Rubinstein's exacting standards. The Trio was composed in Rome during the winter of 1881-2; Tchaikovsky wrote to his brother Anatoli that he was ‘completely engrossed in my new trio, and attracted by this new form of music which I have not tried before and is quite new to me'. After he had finished it he wrote again that ‘it pleases me greatly. Later, maybe, I shall renounce it, and hate it as much as I hate most of my works. At the moment, however, I am proud of it, it satisfies me, and raises me in my own esteem. Lately I felt sure I should not be able to compose any more and life without creative work is pretty pointless.'
Certainly the Trio is a big, ambitious piece in which the composer sets himself a multitude of challenges in what was for him a new medium. After a private performance in April 1882 Tchaikovsky made some revisions before the public premiere, which took place at the Moscow Conservatoire on 18 October with Taneyev playing the taxing piano part. The work was not well received by the press, but did not take long to make its way into the repertoire, where it stands to this day as one of the supreme examples of the piano trio in the Romantic era. Tchaikovsky later sanctioned substantial cuts in its formidable length. The expansive and passionate first movement brims with melodic ideas; it begins with a lyrical tune entrusted to the cello which produces many offshoots in the course of a lengthy exposition. Contrasting with this is a heroic, even martial theme distinguished by massive chordal writing in the piano - indeed the piano part throughout this Trio often resembles the solo part in a concerto. The development section includes a substantial dialogue between cello and piano, and in the coda the opening theme turns elegiac, with a tender duet for violin and cello before the movement finds its calm, sad close. The slow movement is a Theme and Variations, a form of which Tchaikovsky was already an established master. This E major movement is perhaps the most personal and unusual in inspiration of all his variation-sets. He associated the poised and almost classical theme - first stated by the piano - with Rubinstein himself, and the ensuing eleven variations chronicle incidents in Rubinstein's life and memories of times he and Tchaikovsky spent together. As the composer wrote to his halfbrother Modest, ‘one variation is a memory of a trip to an Amusement Park out of town, another of a ball to which we both went and so on'. The Amusement Park is probably to be heard in the quicksilver scherzo of the third variation, the ball in the sixth variation's sumptuous waltz - which also refers to Tchaikovsky's opera Eugene Onegin. But it is better not to look for particular ‘programmatic' connotations in the others. The brief fifth variation, with its high piano writing, is clearly a brilliant evocation of a musical box, according to some commentators - but a ‘troika' or
sleigh-ride, according to others. The eighth is a robust fugue, followed by a lamenting ninth variation marked flebile (mourning, plaintive) with Aeolian-harp figuration in the piano, and a tenth in lively mazurka rhythm. The eleventh variation closes the movement with an enriched restatement of the original theme. Though the second movement is over, the variation process is not. Tchaikovsky's third movement opens with what is, in effect, the twelfth variation in the sequence - a splendidly exciting and vivacious one, large and bold enough to initiate a full-scale finale in A major. It enacts a more or less complete sonata design before its triumphal elation is interrupted by the return of the soulful lyric theme that began the ‘Pezzo elegiaco' first movement, in drastically afflicted unison on the strings against a turbulently emotional piano part. This sudden outpouring of grief issues in a doom-laden coda marked lugubre, where the opening theme is heard for the last time against a Chopinesque funeral-march rhythm in the piano, ebbing away into silence. Tchaikovsky's Trio, with its function as a memorial for Nikolai Rubinstein, seems to have initiated a Russian tradition of ‘elegiac' piano trios - Arensky, for instance, wrote a trio inspired by the death of his (and Tchaikovsky's) friend, the cellist Davidoff. The young Sergei Rachmaninov actually entitled both his early piano trios, composed in quick succession in 1892 and 1893, Trio élégiaque; and the second of those was written under the shock of hearing of the sudden death of Tchaikovsky, who had encouraged him while Rachmaninov was still a student. That three-movement Trio in D minor is by far the better known of the two. Its predecessor, the Trio élégiaque No. 1 in G minor, was written at white-hot speed between 18 and 21 January 1892 and premiered in a recital that the 18-year-old Rachmaninov gave at Moscow Conservatory, where he was still a student, on 30 January. Rachmaninov naturally took the piano part, with his friends the violinist
David Krein and the cellist Anatoly Brandukov (for whom he would later compose a celebrated Cello Sonata.) As far as is known this was its first and last hearing in Rachmaninov's lifetime, and the work was not published until 1947. The fact that it was so speedily written, for performance by the composer himself, probably accounts for the large number of errors in the manuscript and almost complete lack of dynamics in the manuscript, which had to be heavily edited before it was printed. If the later D minor Trio is an elegy for Tchaikovsky, there is no evidence to suggest who might be the subject of the G minor. Its ‘elegiac' nature quite possibly arose from Rachmaninov's own current emotional state. The previous August he had caught a fever as a result of swimming in the chilly waters of the River Matir; his health had deteriorated throughout the Autumn and, though he gradually recovered, he had spent much of the winter in a state of depression. This would seem an adequate explanation for the mood of the Trio, which despite a fine show of activity in its central section seems to end in darkness and despair. The work is in a single movement in a broad sonata-form, with room for some contrasting episodes. Not surprisingly, Rachmaninov assigns pride of place to the piano, making the Trio almost a miniature piano concerto (it was in fact composed shortly after his Piano Concerto No. 1). It opens (with the characteristic expressionmark Lento lugubre) with murmuring, wind-blown string figures that create an evocative background to the dolorous - and already highly charcteristic - main theme, enunciated by the piano. After the strings have had a chance with this melody the music moves to a more active contrasting subject in story-telling style. The development section, marked Apassionato, is principally based on the opening theme and, after a climax and a silence, leads to a full-scale recapitulation of the opening materials. The work concludes with an impressively gloomy coda in the style of a funeral march.
Notes (c) 2010, Malcolm MacDonald
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Franco donatoni - For Grilly - Lied - Lumen - Ash - Arpège - L'ultima sera

Franco donatoni - For Grilly - Lied - Lumen - Ash - Arpège - L'ultima sera
ID: STR33315
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Vocal Collection

13.00 eur Buy

B. Tishchenko - String Quartets, Vol 1 - The Glazunov Quartet

B. Tishchenko - String Quartets, Vol 1 - The Glazunov Quartet
ID: MKM230
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Quartet

13.00 eur Buy
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