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Chamber Music, page 204

   Found CDs: 2199
 

Beat Furrer - Nuun

Beat Furrer - Nuun
ID: KAI0012062
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Chamber Ensemble

The Austrian composer of Swiss origin considers his art to be a "view over the moving matter 'sound'": Beat Furrer does not develop sounds, he observes them, his music does not unfold dynamically with time, but attempts to rescind it: "No beginning", writes Furrer, "everything is present from the start". "nuun" thus filters out the individual layers of an initially almost impenetrable sound, as when you suddenly discover structures in a monochrome painting upon taking a closer look. Furrer then compares the sound dramaturgy of "still" with an electrical circular saw which when set into operation almost inaudibly unfolds greatest power and energy - until it encounters resistance.

Includes booklet with text by Klaus Haendl
16.00 eur Buy

Destination Paris - LENDVAI STRING TRIO

Destination Paris - LENDVAI STRING TRIO
ID: 5060192780079
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: String instruments

This is the debut recording of an ensemble which is already in great demand around Europe. “Throughout, the fluidity of their phrasing and the way that they balanced the work’s classical elegance and its emotional complexity were compelling.” The Strad
16.00 eur Buy

Dmitri Bashkirov - Piano Concertos - Beethoven & CPE Bach

Dmitri Bashkirov - Piano Concertos - Beethoven & CPE Bach
ID: CLAVES501010
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Piano

He is one of the "superstars" of the piano world. An exceptional teacher - his pupils include stars such as Arcadi Volodos or Claire-Marie Le Guay - Dmitri Bashkirov’s debut with Claves combines a most original programme with orchestra. Face to face, we have: Johann Sebastian Bach’s most famous son, Carl Philip Emanuel, forbearer of the great Romantic composers, and an unusual Ludwig van Beethoven. This particular Concerto op. 61a is indeed very rarely played, copying almost note for note the original score of the Violin Concerto op. 61. Written about two years after the completion of the latter, this transcription - for which Etienne Barilier suggests the term "transposition" in the booklet - is shrouded in mystery. Is it the consequence of the original lack of success of the violin concerto, or Beethoven’s response to the pianist and editor Muzio Clementi who commissioned the work? Beyond these unanswered questions, Etienne Barilier underlines the relevance of pairing this work to CPE Bach’s Concerto in C minor: "Bach had written for the harpsichord; to resort to the piano tends to "modernise" his world. Whereas on the other hand, Beethoven’s almost monophonic piano has a somewhat archaic and strangely nude feel, which sends his work back in time. So that for us, both works seem closer to each other in time, with an almost comparable "sensibility", both bright and serene, with the same deep expressivity, free from pathos. For Carl Philip Emanuel Bach, the storms of Romanticism are still far away. For Beethoven, they are very close indeed; in this strange work however, he keeps them at bay." What with Dmitry Bashkirov’s magnificent interpretation and the Orchestre de Chambre de Lausanne’s delicate and artful accompaniment, this will make for a memorable recording.
16.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

Michael Nyman - Mozart 252

Michael Nyman - Mozart 252
ID: MNRCD113
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Vocal Collection
Subcollection: Voices

This album was designed to celebrate the 250th anniversary of the birth of Mozart in 2006, but it seemed more appropriate to miss the boat, by two years - hence the 252. It could equally have been Mozart 30, since it is 30 years since In Re Don Giovanni originally saw the light of day in 1977 in the very first Campiello Band concert, in the National Theatre foyer. The Campiello Band was born out of the onstage band used for my arrangements of 18th century gondoliers’ songs for Bill Bryden's production of Goldoni's ‘Il Campiell’, which opened the Olivier Theatre in October 1976 and was thus the father of the current Michael Nyman Band.

Two main bodies of Mozart-derived works are presented on Mozart 252; the soundtrack to Peter Greenaway's ‘Drowning by Numbers’ (1988), and songs and duets from ‘Letters. Riddles and Writs’, a TV film developed in 1991 with the director Jeremy Newson as part of BBC2's Not Mozart series, which marked the 200th anniversary of Mozart's death.

My “Mozart music” is best understood by reading Pwyll ap Sion's impressive analyses in his book The Music of Michael Nyman:Texts, Contexts and Intertexts (Ashgate, 2007). But, briefly the first Nyman/Mozart collaboration, In Re Don Giovanni effectively samples and remixes the first 16 bars the Catalogue Song from ‘Don Giovanni’, and Revising the Don (a Radio 3 commission for the 250th anniversary) is a lyrical and literal revisiting of In Re.

The ‘Drowning by Numbers’ score is derived, in accordance with Greenaway's strict instructions, entirely from the slow movement of the ‘Sinfonia Concertante’ for violin and viola: Trysting Fields simply 'lists', in order of occurrence and each repeated three times, all the “unprepared” dissonances, (appoggiaturas) from the Mozart piece, and at the end introduces the 8-chord E flat/C minor/A flat/B flat/C min/E flat/A flat/B flat 'rock 'n' roll' sequence which ends the exposition of the movement, and which, along with a kind of retrograde version, is heard throughout Sheep 'n' Tides, Wheelbarrow Walk, Fish Beach and Not Knowing the Ropes (so called because on the ‘Drowning’ soundtrack album it is erroneously called Knowing the Ropes!).

Wedding Tango is built out of a chord-by-chord alternation of both the minor key version (from the very end of the movement) and more familiar major key versions of the 8-chord sequence. Knowing the Ropes, like Trysting Fields is a musical list (though with more conscious structural organization) - this time of a wiggly semiquaver motif, which is threaded through the movement and ends with a grand statement of the theme that is accompanied by the 8-chord sequence in the Mozart original.

‘Letters, Riddles and Writs’ deals in general, through texts taken from Mozart’s letters and riddles (the writs have to do with my frequent theft of Mozart's music) with his relationship with his father (O my dear Papa, a remake of O Isis und Osiris from The Magic Flute), with his own mortality (I am an Unusual Thing, which uses the texts from one of the riddles that Mozart wrote and distributed in Vienna during the 1787 Carnival and is based entirely on extract from two of his Haydn quartets) and with his business acumen [Profit and Loss, modeled on In Re Don Giovanni)
16.00 eur Buy

The Art of Han de Vries - Oboe Concertos

The Art of Han de Vries - Oboe Concertos
ID: CC2004
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Oboe

The CD booklet contains an interview with Han de Vries (printed in English, French and German), in which he talks about
all the works on the CD. There are photos of him throughout his career, and of his extensive instrument collection.

Jeremy Polmear talks to Han de Vries about two of the concertos on the CD:

BACH CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND OBOE:
JP: Am I right in thinking that this recording has not been issued commercially before?
H de V: Yes, it was commissioned by a major Dutch bank - the Verenigde Spaarbank - for its employees. This bank is a good sponsor of the arts as well as sport, and I am glad that one of its products is coming out into the wider world.
JP: And you had no conductor; how did you work out the interpretation?
H de V: The Concertgebouw Chamber Orchestra is made up of the best players in the Concertgebouw Orchestra, and when I played with that orchestra Jaap van Zweden the violin soloist was the leader, and they are wonderful musicians who have worked with Harnoncourt, with Chailly. So the way to approach this music was very clear to us.
JP: By 1986 when you made this recording, you had played Baroque oboe for many years, but here you are playing Baroque music on the modern oboe. Were you influenced by baroque practices?
H de V: Yes of course, and I've been playing Baroque instruments since I was 28. But to play in the Baroque style on the modern oboe, with little or no vibrato, would sound cold and unfeeling. I also have a loyalty to my teachers, to the style of the Concertgebouw, to the musicians I admire, and to the other players. I don't want to be an island of 'I am right'. I want to be somebody who communicates with other musicians, and to the ears of the audience; if I have the joy of being surrounded by very good musicians then I feel I am at my best.

ANDRIESSEN, ANACHRONIE II ('furniture music'):
JP: Let me start by asking you not about the music, but about the words. There seems to be what sounds like railway announcements at the beginning, at the end, and a bit in the middle of this concerto, and as a non Dutch speaker I must ask you - what is the gentleman saying, and does it matter?
H de V: It doesn't matter. In the score there is written a part for Radio. So it can start witrh a weather forecast, or anything. And then the music is a tapestry of quotations, and crazy humouristic, or agressive moments. It starts like Michel Legrand. Then we get a quasi Vivaldi oboe concerto, then an incredible crazy cadenza that ends with the soloist becoming totally insane. Then comes a sort of funeral march of drunken horns. This piece comes from 1969 where all music was quoting others, with bits of Stravinsky and everything mixed upside-down; it is a reaction against so-called 'beautiful music'. Andriessen said to use no vibrato. Sometimes I couldn't resist it, because I thought 'this is too much, too long, too ugly'.
JP: Did you commission the piece?
H de V: I asked him to write an oboe concerto, but the ideas are all his; and he never asked me whether what he had written was possible or impossible to play. In the cadenza he wanted a sort of shawm sound - he actually said 'like a bagpipe' - and I must say it should have been much more agressive and ugly, but there I felt I had to fight for my oboe, and not destroy the ears of my listeners.
JP: But I couldn't help noticing when you were listening to it, the part that amused you most of all was the bit in the cadenza where you honk on low and high notes. Why is that so much fun to hear?
H de V: Yes, because that's the utmost ugly playing, it's leaving behind everything that is beautiful on an oboe - as if a drunken man picks it up and tries to play it. And I laughed because I had to give up all the beauty I always worked for in my life. © 2002 Han de Vries and Jeremy Polmear
16.00 eur Buy

Music for Oboe and Strings - Janet Craxton

Music for Oboe and Strings - Janet Craxton
ID: CC2011
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Oboe

Janet Craxton (1929-81) founded the London Oboe Quartet with Perry Hart (violin), Brian Hawkins (viola) and Kenneth Heath (cello) in 1968, and later with Charles Tunnell (cello) after Kenneth Heath's death in 1977. During the twelve years of its existence the Quartet played at most of the major UK music festivals and made frequent BBC broadcasts, from which these recordings are taken. Janet Craxton was always a champion of new music, and the Quartet commissioned five of the six works on this CD, as well as music by Neil Sanders, Alan Rawsthorne, Oliver Knussen, John Exton and John McCabe.
A previous Oboe Classics CD, An English Renaissance, celebrated Leon Goossens with a number of works inspired by his oboe playing. In the notes for that CD George Caird commented that in the generation following Goossens „the oboe playing of Janet Craxton should be singled out as the torch-bearer for music for oboe and strings. But that, and the composers who wrote for her, is another story.“
16.00 eur Buy

Birtwistle - Orpheus Elegies - Three Bach Arias

Birtwistle - Orpheus Elegies - Three Bach Arias
ID: CC2020
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Subcollection: Voices

Sir Harrison Birtwistle’s compositional life from the mid 1970s to the 1980s was dominated by his opera The Mask of Orpheus, and the same period saw the origin of the Elegies, written for Melinda Maxwell and Helen Tunstall while they were working with the composer at the National Theatre.
‘They are like enchanted preludes…Enchantingly performed here’ The Sunday Times


The 24-page full colour CD booklet has a 6,000 word programme note in English including details of the Orpheus myth and Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus, an interview with Sir Harrison Birtwistle, and a detailed track-by-track
guide, including translations. There are biographies of all the players and many photographs.


Introduction by Melinda Maxwell:

The myth of Orpheus and his music has occupied Sir Harrison Birtwistle (universally known as Harry) for most of his life, and the 26 Orpheus Elegies for oboe, harp and counter-tenor are a further comment in miniature on that myth. They are a re-telling of the story, and the mystery and power that surrounds an imagined music of Orpheus; music that represents a combination of the ethereal - Apollo - and the earthly - Dionysius; music that seduced creation itself with its power of expression.

The Sonnets to Orpheus by Rainer Maria Rilke, known to Harry for a long time, gradually became part of the composition process, and as the music was being written certain words and phrases from those sonnets seemed to clarify and strengthen the meaning of the music.

In time, Harry found that for some of the Elegies, a phrase was not enough. In Elegies 11, 13 and 14 the sonnets are set for voice in their entirety. The voice part is for counter -tenor and written for Andrew Watts. In Elegies 17, 20 and 26 portions of a sonnet are sung. For the remaining twenty Elegies, a phrase taken from a sonnet is written at the end of the instrumental music. For example, Elegy 12 (CD track 16) is fast, manic, rhythmic and repetitive, and the written words are the penultimate line of Sonnet number 5 from Rilke's first set: "the lyre's bars do not constrain his hands". As an aside these words add further meaning to the music, and the music evokes the atmosphere of the words.

Early on in the compositional process, Harry asked me about unusual sounds on the oboe, sounds encompassing harmonics and multiphonics (combinations of sounds that speak together forming chords that have unusual pitch formations and are mostly non-diatonic). I played some to him and wrote down those he liked. He particularly liked pitches that transformed and hung into multiphonics In Elegy 7 these sounds are used almost exclusively, to produce a music that is eerie and other-worldly, finishing with Rilke's words "[He emerged like] ore from the stone's silence". In the very first Elegy based around the note E, Birtwistle uses a double harmonic of an open fifth on E to splice, enrich and delve inside the sound, reaching further depths of expression. Rilke's words for this stark opening are "A tree has risen. Oh pure transcendence!".

Three of the Elegies use metronomes, and these give out a mechanical, inevitable, sense to the music. Elegy 25 uses two metronome pulses at slightly different speeds; Rilke's words are "Does time, the wrecker, really exist?".

The idea for the piece began in the late 1970s when Harry and I and the harpist Helen Tunstall were working at the National Theatre in London, and he expressed the wish to write a piece for oboe and harp. The first draft was written for the 2003 Cheltenham Festival, although not all the Elegies were completed and it was still a work in progress. Certain revisions and further additions ensued, and a longer version appeared in the 2004 Cheltenham Festival. Betty Freeman paid for the commission and Heinz and Ursula Holliger gave the world premičre with Andrew Watts at the Lucerne Festival in September 2004. The London premičre was given by myself, Helen and Andrew in October 2004 at the South Bank.

Throughout many rehearsals and subsequent performances in the UK and at the Holland (2006) and Bregenz (2007) Festivals, Harry offered further insights into our interpretations of phrase, nuance, pace and dynamics, and this recording is the culmination of this entire process. It is a piece full of contrasting voices, from music that is by turns warm, tender, almost wistful, and also bold, relentless, sometimes violent. Each Elegy speaks with its own voice, and such is the power of the composer's invention one feels that many more could follow.
16.00 eur Buy

R. Shchedrin - Carmen Suite / Russian Photographs / Velicanie: Chamber Orchestra Kremlin - Rachlevsky

R. Shchedrin - Carmen Suite / Russian Photographs / Velicanie: Chamber Orchestra Kremlin - Rachlevsky
ID: CLAVES502207
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Chamber Orchestra

16.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

Chamber Orchestra Kremlin: Reinecke

Chamber Orchestra Kremlin: Reinecke
ID: CLAVES502107
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Chamber Orchestra

16.00 eur Temporarily out of stock

Astor Piazzolla - Zuercher Klaviertrio - Schnyder - Ives

Astor Piazzolla - Zuercher Klaviertrio - Schnyder - Ives
ID: CLAVES502106
CDs: 1
Type: CD
Collection: Chamber Music
Subcollection: Trio

16.00 eur Temporarily out of stock
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